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Diagonal earlobe crease

Diagonal earlobe crease (Frank's sign) and increased risk

Earlobe creases seen in a Japanese angina patient Frank's sign is a diagonal crease in the ear lobe extending from the tragus across the lobule to the rear edge of the auricle. The sign is named after Sanders T. Frank. It has been hypothesised that Frank's sign is indicative of cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes Usually, the crease runs diagonally from your ear canal to the outer edge of your earlobe. Studies have linked the presence of diagonal earlobe creases to clogged arteries One such external indicator is diagonal creases Studies have shown that there is an association with the visible external crease on the earlobe and increased risk of atherosclerosis, a disease. Definition and grading of the diagonal earlobe crease The DELC is an earlobe crease extending diagonally from the tragus across the lobule to the rear edge of the auricle. In the study, the participant is diagnosed to have DELC only when the said crease is bilateral These wrinkles were defined as a deep diagonal crease (>1 mm) extending slantwise from the tragus to the outer earlobe and covering at least two-thirds of the length of the lobe

Diagonal earlobe crease and coronary artery disease in a

(Am J Med 1996 02/01;100:0205) The presence of a diagonal ear lobe crease has been recognized as a sign of cardiovascular disease since 1973. Over 50 subsequent studies have been reported in the medical literature, with the largest involving 1,000 unselected patients The creases are bilateral but not symmetrical. The crease on the other ear is a semi-circle... starts at the top of the lobe touching the face and loops in a semi-circle down to where the bottom of the lobe touches the face diagonal earlobe crease (Appendix A) (Frank, 1973). Before 1973, coronary artery disease was determined by the patient's history, familial history and laboratory studies. The complexity of human beings and their interaction with the surroundin Background: The diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) has been proposed to be a marker of coronary artery disease (CAD), but this association still remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of DELC in patients with CAD. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with angiographically documented CAD from Borujerd were evaluated for the presence or absence of ELC

Earlobe Crease & Heart Disease: Fact or Myth? • MyHear

  1. Diagonal earlobe crease (DELC), the wrinkle at 45° between the auricle and the tragus, also known as Frank's sign, was first reported to be associated with CAD by Sanders T. Frank in 1973 when he noted it in 20 patients with angina
  2. Background: The diagonal ear lobe crease also known as Frank's sign is a diagonal crease in the ear lobe that extends from the tragus across the lobule to the posterior edge of the auricle
  3. The association between diagonal earlobe creases and fatal cardiovascular disease was investigated in a consecutive series of 303 coroner's necropsies. Those studied all died outside hospital in the Brighton Health District. Data were analysed on the cause of death and on the type of earlobe, the presence or absence of diagonal creases, age, sex, height, and any previous history of.

Earlobe Crease May Signal Increased Risk of Strok

The Heart-Head Connection: Heart Disease and Ears

Objectives: To investigate the association between diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Limited data exists in South Asia and no prior studies have been performed in Pakistan to assess this relationship. Methods: In this case-control study, 200 participants from December 2015 to March 2016 at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan were enrolled Search criteria. We searched PubMed up to 1 st of November 2014 using combinations of the following keywords: earlobe crease, ear lobe crease, ear-lobe crease, ear crease, ear creases, coronary artery disease and Frank's sign. Randomized controlled trials, original papers, review articles and case reports are included in the present review

Crease in Earlobe Causes: Vertical, Can it be Reversed, in

Frank's sign - Wikipedi

One of the more common and easy to spot changes in auricular diagnosis is the diagonal earlobe crease, and here is why it is important to detect. Several studies in auricular (ear) diagnosis have observed the correlation of a diagonal ear lobe crease (ELC) with a high predictive value for coronary heart disease The Mark of a Heart Attack on Your Ear? It's called diagonal earlobe crease or DELC for short. George W. Bush has it, as well as Steven Spielberg. It looks like a little slash mark just above the earlobe. Though we are not born with it, this mark starts to appear later in life and becomes more and more common the older we are The association between diagonal earlobe creases and fatal cardiovascular disease was investigated in a consecutive series of 303 coroner's necropsies. Those studied all died outside hospital in the Brighton Health District. Data were analysed on the cause of death and on the type of earlobe, the presence or absence of diagonal creases, age, sex, height, and any previous history of. Eventually, thick ear lobes can develop a diagonal crease, called Frank's crease or Frank's sign (1).. By the time Frank's sign appears, there is an extremely strong association with heart disease, more than just a red flag. One study (2) found that 78% of people with Frank's ear lobe crease have heart disease Frank's sign describes a diagonal earlobe crease, a wrinkle that extends 45° backward from the tragus to the auricle. It was first described by Sanders T. Frank, an American physician in 1973 and is a predictive dermatological finding of coronary artery disease. 1, 2 Studies have shown an independent association between Frank's sign and cardiovascular diseases as well as other vascular.

Excessive sweating, earlobe crease and other signs of an

THE diagonal ear-lobe crease described below appears more commonly in patients with coronary heart disease and should be regarded as a coronary risk factor. Although other risk factors may be prese.. The diagonal ear-lobe crease, a physical sign associated with coronary heart disease Acta Med Scand , 619 ( 1978 ) , pp. 1 - 49 View Record in Scopus Google Schola Background: The diagonal ear lobe crease (ELC) has been suggested as a simple marker of vascular disease in the general population but there are few data from diabetic patients despite their increased risk of angiopathy. Aim: To determine whether the ELC is a clinically useful sign of coronary artery disease (CAD) or retinopathy in type 2 diabetes

The Hidden Connection Between Your Ear Crease And Heart

Diagonal earlobe crease (DELC), the wrinkle at 45° between the auricle and the tragus, also known as Frank's sign, was first reported to be associated with CAD by Sanders T. Frank in 1973 when he noted it in 20 patients with angina [6] Background: The diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) has been proposed to be a marker of coronary artery disease (CAD), but this association remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of DELC in patients with CAD. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with angiographically documented CAD from Tehran Heart Center were evaluated for the presence or absence. A deep crease could be cause for concern The condition, known as Frank's sign, is a diagonal earlobe crease that was found to have a relationship to risk of stroke. The crease may signal poor blood supply to the earlobes, or could be a symptom of weakening in the blood vessels. It could also be related to aging One of the most investigated auricular signs in the literature is undoubtedly the diagonal ear lobe crease (ELC). When Frank10 in 1973, in a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine, described his 'aural sign of coronary artery disease' he cannot have imagined that he would trigger a long and unbroken series of researches all over the world. . There are probably 40 or more reports and. Prior studies suggest that Frank's sign may be an independent predictor of significant coronary artery disease. 1,2 Proposed mechanisms for the diagonal earlobe crease include premature degeneration of elastin fibers, shortened telomeres, and dysfunction of end arteries affecting blood supply. 3 In a prospective study, Frank's sign was 90% sensitive and 32% specific for predicting.

Six unusual signs that may indicate heart disease CN

It is a diagonal crease in the earlobe that starts from the tragus to the edge of the auricle in an angle of 45° in varying depths. Frank's sign was described as a predictor of future coronary heart disease and peripheral vascular diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the association between Frank's sign and the development of ischemic. Frank's sign is a diagonal earlobe crease that extends 45° backwards from the tragus to the auricle, which is hypothesised to be a predictor of atherosclerotic disease. Large population prospective study has shown significant association of Frank's sign with increased risks of ischaemic heart disease and myocardial infarctions Diagonal ear-lobe crease: prevalence and implications as a coronary risk factor. N Engl J Med. 1974 Mar 14; 290 (11):615-616. [Google Scholar] Kirkham N, Murrells T, Melcher DH, Morrison EA. Diagonal earlobe creases and fatal cardiovascular disease: a necropsy study. Br Heart. A diagonal crease across your earlobe at a 45 degree downward angle toward your shoulder may be an early warning sign of a potentially fatal heart attack, according to reports in Modern Medicine (57,10:126) and British Heart Journal (611,4:361)

Earlobe Crease & Cardiovascular Disease. This blog is all about prevention of disease, so one would think that the slightest sign of an abnormality would be cause to start the process of reversing the process whatever caused the abnormality? There is a connection between a diagonal earlobe crease (1,2) and cardiovascular disease This crease is known as Frank's mark (Picture Getty) If you have diagonal creases across your ear lobes, it could be a worrying sign that you're at increased risk of suffering a stroke

Diagonal earlobe crease: Prevalence and association with

  1. A STILL-UNCLEAR ASSOCIATION. Sanders T. Frank, in 1973, first described a diagonal wrinkle-like line on the earlobe as a sign of coronary artery disease. 1 Subsequently, autopsy studies suggested that deep bilateral earlobe creases could be an important sign of coronary atherosclerosis. 2 Diagonal earlobe creases have been shown to be independently associated with increased prevalence, extent.
  2. Many reports have claimed associations between diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) and coronary artery disease (CAD), but data in Chinese populations are limited. This cohort study investigated 449 consecutive Chinese, 250 cases with CAD and 199 without CAD, who were certified by coronary artery angiography in our center. Characteristic differences and the relation of DELC to CAD were assessed by.
  3. ation, which costs nothing and does no harm to patients. An early study in 1973 firstly showed that the presence of DELC reflects vascular atherosclerosis and is associated with the human.
  4. Cheng TO. More research needed on the association between diagonal earlobe crease and coronary artery disease. Arch Intern Med. 2000 Aug 14-28;160(15):2396-7. Eber B, Delgado P. More on the diagonal earlobe crease as a marker of coronary artery disease. Am J Cardiol. 1993 Oct 1;72(11):861

Since 1973, several studies have demonstrated a link between a specific form of ear lobe crease on both ears and an increased incidence of CAD. It is thought that if an individual has diagonal creases on both ear lobes, there may be some benefit in undergoing screening to exclude the possibility of CAD. Similar links with CAD have been found. In addition to xanthelasma palpebrarum, his bilateral ears showed a diagonal earlobe crease (ELC) running down from the tragus to the edge of the auricle at a 45° angle, which is so-called Frank's sign (Panel A). He underwent coronary angiography for suspected unstable angina

Of note, the authors of the aforementioned angiography study commented on the fact that among the patients with severe coronary artery stenotic lesions, the PAC was very frequently seen simultaneously with a diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) ( Fig 2)1—a dermatologic sign that also has been validated as a risk indicator of the presence, extent, and severity of ischemic heart disease and. Diagonal earlobe crease and coronary artery disease in a Chinese population. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, 2014. Maryam Montazer DOI: 10.1056/NEJMicm1213006. An 84-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia presented to the emergency department with a 6-hour history of visual difficulty. Physical. The diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) is the fold or crease in the skin of the earlobe. It is also known as Frank's sign. A study published in the BMJ followed more than 500 adult patients who have.

Diagonal Ear Crease Linked To Increased Risk Of Coronary

128950. EARLOBE CREASE. TEXT. Frank (1973) and Lichstein et al. (1974) suggested that a diagonal crease of the earlobe is an indication of increased risk of coronary heart disease. Whether the trait is mendelian is not clear. The frequency of the trait seems to increase with the age of the cohort. Elliot (1983) confirmed an association between. a deep diagonal crease extending obliquely from the tragus towards the outer border of the ear lobe, covering at least two-thirds of the ear lobe length. Whenever there was more than 1 crease, at least 1 should have met the above criteria. A typical ELC in one of the patients is shown in Figure Diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) is defined as a fold or crease in the skin of the earlobe [1] (Figure 1). Since DELC was first described, various studies have demonstrated the relationship between it an In this study, we examined the usefulness of the earlobe crease sign as a marker of coronary artery disease in the pre‐operative assessment of patients. We were interested in evaluating this sign f.. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the diagonal earlobe crease and the incidence of coronary artery disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A descriptive, correlational, retrospective and concurrent approach was utilized in examining 61 patients, all with a cardiac catheterization within the last six months. All were examined for the presence of diagonal earlobe.

My left ear lobe has the diagonal crease but not the right ear lobe. I also have type II diabetes and low thyroid. Age: 73. I exercise, eat a Mediterranean diet, and take a ton of pills and supplements. My father and brother both had type II diabetes and died of strokes. My father died at age 79 and my brother at age 80 Diagonal Crease in Ear In a study of 340 admitted to a hospital in Montreal with chest pains, 95,7% percent of men who had a diagonal crease in their ear goin more than halfway across the earlobe were were found to have a heart attack triggered by obstructive coronary artery disease The sign is a diagonal earlobe crease which can indicate poor blood supply to the earlobes, or weakening in the blood vessels. In the study, 79 percent of the 241 patients who were hospitalized with a stroke had Frank's sign A positive earlobe crease was detected in 67% of this population. When examining the presence of CAD in men with (n =175) and without (n = 86) an earlobe crease, 85% of those with and 85% of those without an earlobe crease showed some degree of CAD

What Does A Crease In Your Earlobe Mean? - Depke Wellness

  1. Diagnoal vs Horizontal Ear Crease. Carrie46. I have just noticed significant bilateral horizontal ear lob creases. As a 46 y/o RN who many years ago worked in the coronary care unit, I recalled something about ear lob creases and CAD. I have a long standing history of hypertension, well maintained on a beta blocker and K+ sparing diuretic and.
  2. Diagonal earlobe creases and prognosis in patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Am J Med. 1996; 100:205-211. Crossref Medline Google Scholar; 5. Celik S, Erdoğan T, Gedikli O, Kiriş A, Erem C. Diagonal ear-lobe crease is associated with carotid intima-media thickness in subjects free of clinical cardiovascular disease.
  3. Diagonal ear lobe crease ( DELC ) (Frank's Sign) is a crease on the earlobe that goes diagonally in different depths with an angle of about 45 degrees. ( Source) In 1973, an American pulmonologist ( specialist in the respiratory system) named Sanders T. Frank was the first to connect an ear lobe crease to heart disease
The tell-tale signs of a stroke: How a crease in your EAR

Earlobe crease must be from front to back? - Heart Disease

Ear Lobe Crease. If you ask people to name the biggest single harbinger of aging, most will say wrinkles - on the forehead, neck and even hands. But the ear lobe? A diagonal crease on one or both ears (it looks like an earring has been ripped out of the ear) that begins at the bottom of the ear opening and reaches diagonally across the lobe to. Creases are sometimes linked with conditions that are passed down through families. Other genetic factors, such as race and earlobe shape, may also determine who develops earlobe creasing and when it occurs. It is not uncommon to have one small abnormality in facial features, such as an earlobe crease The Diamond-Forrester (DF) algorithm overestimates the likelihood of significant coronary artery disease (≥50% stenosis, CAD50). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the addition of a diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) enhances the predictive ability of DF to detect CAD50 by coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA). We evaluated 430 patients referred for CTA for symptoms. While earlobe creases mean little for infants, they may be a significant indicator in adults, although studies have yet to prove a connection 1. It is possible that diagonal ear creases in an adult is a be a sign of heart disease, reports the University of Maryland Medical Center

Figure 1

Diagonal earlobe creases and coronary artery diseas

  1. Background: The diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) has been proposed to be a marker of coronary artery disease (CAD), but this association remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of DELC in patients with CAD
  2. the diagonal earlobe crease: a cutaneous manifestation of coronary artery disease author wyre hw jr national naval med. cent., bethesda md 20014, usa source cutis; usa; da. 1979; vol. 23; no 3; pp. 328-331; bibl. 7 ref. document type article language english keyword (fr) cardiopathie coronaire pli cutane lobe oreille homme pathologie.
  3. ations have shown that there is a higher prevalence of earlobe creases.

BACKGROUND Diagonal earlobe crease (ELC) have been proposed as a marker of generalized atherosclerosis, so in the present study it was investigated whether individuals with ELC have a shortened telomere, which correlates with an accelerated cell turnover and premature aging, leading to atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS The mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) was determined by Southern. Make sure you SUBSCRIBE for NEW VIDEOS every MONDAY! Follow me on Instagram:https://www.Instagram.com/DrDaves411Like my Facebook page:https://www.Facebook.co.. Classification of the ELC according to its course. (A) Diagonal crease extending between the tragus and the posteroinferior lobe edge.(B) Vertical crease extending between the tragus and the anteroinferior lobe edge.(C) Unclassifiable earlobe: When the presence of the ELC could not be determined, all were considered negative (in this case, the lobe was cut off despite the insinuation of a.

A receding hairline and a deep diagonal crease on earlobe is a sign of future heart attack. It may be time to start walking a mile a day, eating brown rice a.. The association between the presence of diagonal earlobe crease (ELC) and coronary artery disease (CAD) was first reported by Fank 1973 (positive ear lobe sign). This connection still remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between bilateral ELC, preauricular creases (PAC) to CAD and other coronary risk. A diagonal earlobe crease is a better indicator of sudden death from heart attack than age, smoking, weight, high cholesterol, or sedentary lifestyle. For some reason a creased earlobe doesn't increase the risk of heart attack in Asians and Native Americans We investigated the frequency and clinical significance of diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) in cognitively impaired patients using imaging biomarkers, such as white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on MRI and amyloid-β (Aβ) PET. A total of 471 cognitively impaired patients and 243 cognitively normal (CN) individuals were included in this study Whether Frank's sign diagonal earlobe creases is a predictor of underlying coronary artery disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular diseases or merely a trivial sign of aging process is still unclear. The length, depth, bilateralism, and inclination of frank's sign diagonal earlobe creases seem to relate to cardiovascular events 10)

Abstract The role of diagonal ear lobe crease (DELC) in coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis and prognosis remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the combined effect of DELC with other conventional risk factors in the diagnosis and prognosis of CAD in Chinese patients who underwent angiography and coronary stent implantation Diagonal earlobe crease HP:0031511 Diagonal earlobe creases run from the lower pole of the external meatus, diagonally backwards to the edge of the lobe at approximately 45 degrees. Synonyms: No synonyms found for this term ear-lobe sign' is associated with the develop-ment of premature coronary artery athero-sclerosis have been heralded.4 The diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) is the fold or crease in the skin of the ear-lobe originally described by Frank in 1973.5 Several other reports regarding DELC as a risk factor for CHD have since been published.6 Althoug The presence of ear lobe crease (ELC) and its association with CHD was first described in 1973. Blodgett et al found that 75% of CHD cases had ear lobe crease as compared to 35% of the controls.

An earlobe crease — a diagonal fold or wrinkle in the skin of your earlobe. The risk was higher whether you had one, two or all three of those characteristics. It's not clear why, but Haythe said she does pay attention to patients' ears and eyelids much more since the study came out. Follow TODAY Health and Wellness on Facebook Studies also call this sign DELC (Diagonal Earlobe Crease) and have found it prevalent in coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease and cerebrovascular disease (2,3,4). Although this sign is more common among patients with coronary issues, the sign is identified well before symptoms occur or tests show coronary issues Diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) is hypothesized mainly due to atherosclerosis and thus, it may has diagnostic value of coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between diagonal earlobe crease and coronary heart disease The diagonal crease in one's earlobe may hint to underlying atherosclerosis. The vessel damage and cholesterol plaques can affect blood flow to the brain. Hence, both conditions share similar risks

A Crease in an Infant's Ear | LIVESTRONGLobule of Ear / Earlobe/ Auricular Lobule – Earth's LabDiagonal earlobe crease: Prevalence and association with

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): (A study conducted while final-year medical students) A DIAGONAL ear-lobe crease as an independent risk factor in coronary heart disease was first suggested by Frank 2 in 1973 and further work by Lichstein and associates3 4, s supported Frank's initial observations A 2012 study conducted at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles and published in The American Journal of Cardiology found that subjects with a diagonal earlobe crease were far more likely to. ear lobe crease: a diagonal crease found on one or both earlobes with a possible connection to coronary heart disease in males On arrival, his vital signs were stable and physical examination revealed Frank's sign, a diagonal crease in the earlobe that runs backward from the tragus at a 45° angle across the lobule to the rear edge of the auricle ().A coronary angiography showed the triple-vessel disease again (figure 1E,F).He subsequently underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery and he was relieved from the. High Blood Pressure (HBP) Having hypertension, a.k.a. high blood pressure, is a red flag for other forms of heart disease, increasing your risk for CAD, heart attack, heart failure, and stroke.